Charles T. Lee Author, Speaker, Idea Maker 2016-05-23T22:39:50Z http://charlestlee.com/feed/atom/ WordPress Charles Lee <![CDATA[Learnings from Iterating Our Business]]> http://charlestlee.com/?p=10826 2016-05-12T18:23:38Z 2016-05-12T16:41:12Z Change is Inevitable. Progress is Not.
Every business experiences change, but not every business will experience progress.

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Change is Inevitable. Progress is Not.

Every business experiences change, but not every business will experience progress.

Progress is the result of strategic efforts made by businesses to refine who they are, what they do, and why they exist. Progress takes focused effort and commitment to meaningful iteration over time. Accidental progress (i.e., reactive happenstance) may occur from time to time, but the kind of progress that elevates business at its core requires strategic building.

Our company, Ideation, recently went through another cycle of iterations over this past year that has refined our business design. We originally started the business in 2009 as a branding firm that delivered brand strategy and related design deliverables. During the first 3 years, we tried lots of different creative service deliverables in order to find an emergent product or service that would distinguish us from our competition. We worked on everything from developing processes for extending brands, product innovation, network & partnership strategy, integrated marketing, event production, app & platform development, and whole list of other services. We knew early on that distinctiveness in offering would require a significant volume of work to “find ourselves” as a company.

In 2013, we entered our second cycle of iteration as a company. As we reflected on the various types of projects and clients we had engaged over the first 3 years, it was clear that a thread began to emerge that highlighted our core competency. Our uniqueness was rooted in our ability to move complex ideas, plans, and visions into a strategic pathways for day-to-day execution. We saw a clear opportunity to bridge the world of strategy with the world of creative execution. We had developed turnkey processes and pathways to steward and project manage ideas from inspiration to implementation. We were fortunate to have on our team experienced strategy consultants, talented creatives, and strong project managers. So, we began to tell the story of idea-execution as service.

The Challenge

While we were gaining clarity internally within our company about who were and what we were providing, it was still difficult for many outside our company to create a new category of business outside of traditional consulting groups and creative agencies. We were neither, but kind of both. Our premise was that effective execution requires skill sets from both worlds. Nevertheless, it was not easy to communicate. The struggle continued to iterate forward.

Seeking Advice & Wisdom

In 2015, I decided to invest in seeking wisdom from mentors and those who I have admired from a distance. Learning has always been a big value of our company, but I needed make a personal commitment to grow as the founder. I started to reach out to people I knew and some I didn’t to see if they might be consider contributing to the success of our company. Yes, I called in some favors. I also started taking courses online to further refine our business model and future direction. As a result, in late 2015, we were able to identify what our next iteration of our company would possibly look like.

Aha Moment

It became clear to us as we learned from others and gathered input that we were creating a new category of business. Could this be a disruptive innovation (borrowing the words of Clayton Christensen)? Maybe. We’ll see.

We identified a void that exists between the work of large consulting firms and the large creative agencies that work with leading brands. Executives needed help in translating what strategic plans meant for their respective business units and creative support to better execute on their ideas, whether internal or external facing. Many lacked the strategic and creative support needed to ideate and execute on innovation concepts. We discovered that our type of company was a perfect fit for this level of engagement and execution. We didn’t have to become a large strategy firm nor a large creative agency. We needed to focus our attention on mixing strategy AND creative to help executives refine and implement their ideas. It was a simple idea yet we didn’t see too many other companies in this space go for this opportunity. Most were either individual consultants who didn’t have a creative support team or large entities that couldn’t or wouldn’t engage at this low end. For us, we had found our niche. We exist to help executives refine and implement their ideas with creative support. Word has spread quickly about our work because we’ve found a tribe that needs what we do.

Our latest iteration as a company has focused us in a way that we’ve been looking for over the past 6.5 years of existence. While I know this is not the last iteration, it’s clear that we would not be where we are without a commitment to iterating progress.

Questions to Consider for Your Business

  • How does your organization iterate itself?
  • What are some intentional things you could do to iterate forward whether as an individual, team, or company?
  • Who do you learn from and how do you learn best? Is your learning diverse?
  • How do you record your progress?

Let’s keep moving forward friends. Our future versions of our companies can be much better than anything we can imagine today.

Dream Big. Start Small. Keep Moving.

Ideation – An Idea Execution Company from Ideation on Vimeo.

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Charles Lee <![CDATA[Doing Your Job Is Not Enough]]> http://charlestlee.com/?p=10781 2016-05-02T16:53:44Z 2016-03-23T16:47:45Z "As long as you get your work done, you'll be okay." False.

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“As long as you get your work done, you’ll be okay.” False.

No matter the age, profession, or size of company, there still appears to be this belief with many in the “workforce” that as long as we complete the tasks assigned to us by our bosses, clients, and/or project management software, we are “successful” in our work or career. It’s as if many approach work like a factory worker who works within their respective lane of activity and hopes nothing interrupts what they need to accomplish to keep the lines moving. Or maybe, some of us have never shaken off the poor habit from school of doing the most minimal amount of work possible while still getting a passing grade.

Knowing what to do isn’t even half the battle.

I know you’re probably super intelligent and up on all the business and professional development trends and insights. That’s why you keep reading these types of posts and articles. Let me bring you into a little secret, most posts and articles are written to increase click throughs, sales of ad space, and primarily provide super high-level insights about whatever is hot at the moment. It’s not to say you can’t get anything good from magazines, blogs, and news sources, but you have to be able to see what they’re actually selling you.

Over time, if you’re not careful, you’re actually going to believe most of what’s written and it will skew your view of reality. It will easily make us feel smarter than we actually are, more relevant than we know what to do with, and more entitled without actually changing our lives. Kind of sounds like a recipe for disaster, no? Generalizations about market research, trends, “best practices”, etc. are just that…generalizations.

Here’s a crazy thing about knowledge in general. It makes you think you are doing something even when you’re not. It’s much more enjoyable to think about what could be, what should be, and why it’s not happening. Knowledge should propel us to move beyond the expectations in our lives, but isn’t it ironic that it often keeps us stuck where we are by distracting us in the hypothetical?

I can’t tell you how many people I meet that are so “forward-thinking” and yet default to an antiquated approach to moving forward. Look, if you want get ahead, it’s less about changing your workflow, hours, etc. and more about going above and beyond anyone’s expectations and doing the hard things that build your life and career.

Work harder, think smarter, and produce louder.

I can’t think of anyone (outside of the few that have simply inherited “success”) who have accomplished something significant without going beyond their day-to-day job requirements. Going through life by doing the minimal and being an exemplary employee should never be anyone’s goal. We have to thrive beyond what’s expected, fine tune our ability to think clearly through the noise and distractions around us, and speak up by producing great work that we’ve created to better our lives and the world we live in. Of course, I’m not saying that we work ourselves to death. (Then again, I don’t think workaholism a problem for most of us.) Wisdom is usually in the middle somewhere. In this case, it sits between the extreme of minimalism and workaholism.

Still reading this?

Congrats! You’ve made it to the end of this post. I really do believe all of us have the ability to rise above the expectations that others put on us. I’m not even saying that we have to meet their expectations. What I know to be true (which you can test in your own life) is that no one is going to hand you success. You have to go after it. For me, this has very little to do with money and a whole lot more to do with purpose. My drive is rooted in my desire to live out my purpose. I realized early on that my purpose can’t be rooted in some job description that my boss gives me. Nothing on paper is ever going to encompass all that I am purposed to do. This means that I have to make time and work towards building things that can’t be confined to a day’s work. Some call this over-delivering, but I feel that it’s really just living out who I think I’m designed to be.

Maybe some of you were born with some supernatural talent. I’m a little jealous but very happy for you. For the rest of us, let’s step it up a bit and experience life more fully. Let’s not make excuses and lean on articles written about what we’d like to be. Life is short. Let’s go do something meaningful.

 

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Charles Lee <![CDATA[Always Look for “Number 2”]]> http://charlestlee.com/?p=10775 2016-05-02T16:54:56Z 2016-03-16T16:15:21Z While the face of the brand is usually super inspiring and talented, good leaders surround themselves with a great "#2".

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Looking Beyond the Face

Most companies have a go-to face for the brand. It’s usually its founder or CEO. They are usually the ones speaking, taking interviews, and providing vision for the organization. They usually have the “goods” for inspiring others and making core decisions that impact the future of their respective brands. They are often strong communicators and carry a presence into most rooms. These are the individuals that most people outside of the organization want to connect to and get to know.

Don’t Forget #2

What I’ve learned over the years is that while the face of the brand is usually super inspiring and talented, good leaders surround themselves with a great “#2”. These are often the softer spoken and behind the scenes individuals who really help to inform and guide a company (as well as its CEO). They care less about being the face or drawing attention and more about making sure the organization fulfills its purpose.

I have yet to meet a great leader that doesn’t have a great #2. These are unsung heroes of an organization.

Find #2 & Learn

I usually do my best to connect with people in this role. I find that they have so much to offer with both insights and opportunities for connection. They probably know many areas of the runnings of an organization that the CEO or founder may have no idea about. They know the ins and outs of what makes their brand work. In addition, these individuals are generally far more accessible and have a spirit of mutual learning that sometimes CEO’s and founders don’t have. I think it’s in part because they are in a role where they have to continue to learn and be on their game to better support the organization.

Next time you’re in a room of “#1’s”, always look for their “#2’s”.

 

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Charles Lee <![CDATA[Surviving (& Thriving) through the Hype Cycle]]> http://charlestlee.com/?p=10753 2016-05-02T16:55:35Z 2016-02-18T17:50:48Z Most ideas are filled with hype. Understandably so, good ideas are designed to take us beyond where we are to where we could be (which is usually a much better place).

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Most ideas are filled with hype.

Understandably so, good ideas are designed to take us beyond where we are to where we could be (which is usually a much better place).

Now the challenge…

Choosing to engage or not engage a “good idea” is something we all have to make a decision on quite regularly. There are so many ideas and so many factors that drive their success. How do you manage risk? A lot of this really has to do with our understanding of where the idea sits in its hype cycle.

There’s a helpful graph called the “Gartner Hype Cycle” that was originally designed to describe the cycle that technology ideas go through into order to move from an idea to deployment into the market. In my opinion, the descriptions and key moments in this cycle also provide helpful insights into other industries that seek to navigate idea implementation.

Gartner Hype Cycle.001

As described by Gartner, the Hype Cycle drills down into the 5 key phases of a technology’s life cycle:

Technology Trigger: A potential technology breakthrough kicks things off. Early proof-of-concept stories and media interest trigger significant publicity. Often no usable products exist and commercial viability is unproven.

Peak of Inflated Expectations: Early publicity produces a number of success stories — often accompanied by scores of failures. Some companies take action; many do not.

Trough of Disillusionment: Interest wanes as experiments and implementations fail to deliver. Producers of the technology shake out or fail. Investments continue only if the surviving providers improve their products to the satisfaction of early adopters.

Slope of Enlightenment: More instances of how the technology can benefit the enterprise start to crystallize and become more widely understood. Second- and third-generation products appear from technology providers. More enterprises fund pilots; conservative companies remain cautious.

Plateau of Productivity: Mainstream adoption starts to take off. Criteria for assessing provider viability are more clearly defined. The technology’s broad market applicability and relevance are clearly paying off.

How do people use this in decision-making?

People use this frame of understanding to make some of the following plays on ideas:

  • Early Adopter Approach – These individuals are willing to combine risk-taking with an understanding that risky investments don’t always pay off jump in early with the idea and choose to stay with the idea through the phases. Most who engage this early have the ability and resources to withstand the early phases.
  • Moderate Approach – These individuals are moderate in their approach and need a sound cost/benefit analysis when new ways of doing things are not yet fully proven. These individuals will join the efforts much later on in the process and are willing to give up the “up side” by coming in when there’s more basis for engagement.
  • Further Maturation Approach – These individuals will not move when there are too many unanswered questions around the commercial viability. They do not mind waiting until others have delivered tangible value.

A few things to keep in mind…

No matter when you engage a new technology or an idea, it’s important to keep in mind the following:

  • Ideas go through hype cycles. Most good ideas will experience inflated expectations, trough of disillusionment, slope of enlightenment, and plateau of productivity. Ideas are fluid and require maturing over time. It’s the nature of ideas being implemented.
  • Patience is still a virtue. There are very few if any overnight successes with ideas. Being patient and committed to delayed gratification is a must. Think long-term.
  • Play it smart. We all have varying degrees of risk tolerance and it’s okay. Understand what you’re able to withstand as well as who you’re working with since most ideas don’t happen in a vacuum and alone. Do you know the risk tolerance of others in your team or the team of the one you are investing in?

A point of reference like the Hype Cycle can provide much needed framing for our pursuit of ideas. Take a moment and see where your idea sits in this cycle. It is possible to not only survive this cycle but also thrive through it.

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Charles Lee <![CDATA[3 Minute Focus Exercise]]> http://charlestlee.com/?p=10732 2016-05-02T16:56:04Z 2016-01-11T16:39:23Z A Discipline Worth Fighting For   It’s becoming increasingly difficult to focus on an idea or project let alone clear headspace to reflect and create. The tantalizing noise that surrounds us

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A Discipline Worth Fighting For

 

It’s becoming increasingly difficult to focus on an idea or project let alone clear headspace to reflect and create. The tantalizing noise that surrounds us often ends up consuming us. This is unfortunate because any significant requires our undivided attention for its execution. If you have a desire to create things filled with beauty, meaning, and intuitive simplicity, you’re going to have to focus. I’m reminded of what Steve Jobs once said…

“That’s been one of my mantras – focus and simplicity. Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it’s worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains.”

Focus is birthed out of discipline and discipline can only take shape as you work on it each day. In the area of focus, I do a quick 3 (sometimes 5) minutes exercise daily that helps me both refine my ability to focus and create space in my thinking to decompress and realign my thoughts. I hope you find it helpful in moving your ideas forward.

 

  1. Pick a small item. This could be anything like a object on your desk, toy, fabric, product package, picture, etc. It doesn’t have to be anything of great meaning to you personally.
  2. Spend three minutes looking closely at the object. Pay attention to the small details (e.g., color, threading, shapes, design, texture, etc.).
  3. Note one new insight about the object. Take a few seconds to mentally note or put on paper one new insight or perspective you’ve gained from the exercise. It’s doesn’t have to be earth shattering. Just one thing you walking with that you’ve learned to appreciate more.

 

Doing this everyday with objects that don’t necessarily have immediate impact on your life or work is healthy. It forces you to strengthen your ability to focus as well as allows you to take a break from the madness of noise that sits all around you. Try it for a month and let me know what you think.

 

Dream Big. Start Small. Keep Moving.

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Charles Lee <![CDATA[3 Key Insights to Moderating Memorable Interviews & Panels]]> http://charlestlee.com/?p=10728 2016-05-02T16:56:34Z 2016-01-05T17:24:22Z More than Public Speaking   Public speaking has been a part of my professional life for 25 years now. I enjoy engaging audiences with relevant topics that add value to

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More than Public Speaking

 

Public speaking has been a part of my professional life for 25 years now. I enjoy engaging audiences with relevant topics that add value to their life and work. Good content delivered in a memorable fashion often sparks beneficial change in the lives of the people experiencing the presentation. It’s an honor to speak and I’m thankful for each opportunity to do so.

More recently, over the past 5 years or so, I’ve been approached with increasing regularity with opportunities to moderate interviews and panels. This is a new area of learning for me and I’ve found it to be quite challenging to moderate interviews and panels in way that will be memorable for the audience. It’s quite different than presenting content as a speaker. Good moderation requires different modes of thinking and focused execution. I’ve come to enjoy these opportunities very much and have committed a good amount of time becoming better at it over the years.

Here are 3 insights I’ve gained in moderating memorable interviews and panels. I hope you find them helpful if you find yourself in this role.

 

Insight #1 – Center the conversation on the one(s) being interviewed.

This sounds like common sense (because it is!), but it’s surprising to watch so many moderators who think the center of an interview is the one interviewing. Good moderators know how to contribute meaningful questions and content without being the center of attention. It’s important for moderators to really focus in on the words coming out of the interviewee or panel members rather than running through a list of questions they want to get through. While it’s definitely essential to be well prepared with questions, it’s even more important to be present in the moment as the conversation is unfolding. I always try to put myself in the shoes of the one(s) being interviewed to think through their mindset and hopes for the conversation.

 

Insight #2 – Think deep rather than broad.

No interview will be able to cover everything the audience wants to hear about. Unfortunately, too many moderators react to this by only asking surface questions that cover a broad spectrum of topics. Ultimately, the audience leaves the experience feeling like they really didn’t get anything substantive out of an interview. I’ve found that it’s better to go deeper on a few topics than go broader with many. I will often search online for other interviews that my interviewee has participated in and take time to listen and try to understand their unique perspectives and even behaviors during interviews. People generally enjoy more substantive content and this can only come by going deeper, especially since most interviews are limited in time.

 

Insight #3 – Bridge application for the audience. 

It’s important to make sure bridge application points during the tail end of an interview when possible to help the audience internally articulate what they’ve just heard. I try to think ahead on what potential points of application that may come out of the interview. While I may not use all of these application insights, I do find that I do use many of them if I have done a good job of preparing for the interview. This really helps to “bring things home” at the end of the conversation and nicely frames the interview for the listener so they can walk away with something tangible.

 

If you are a moderator or have moderated in the past, what are some things that have helped you in preparing for interviews? I’d love to learn from your experience.

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Charles Lee <![CDATA[Tips for Accomplishing Your Professional Goals in 2016]]> http://charlestlee.com/?p=10721 2016-05-02T16:57:00Z 2016-01-04T17:47:34Z It's that time of year again...

Resolutions. Renewed Focus. Dreamcasting. Goal Setting.

No matter what you are committing yourself to this year, anyone serious about accomplishing set goals will have to embrace the prioritization of thoughts and habits in order to see their desires come to life. Here are some day-to-day tips that might help you actualize your professional goals in 2016 (in no particular order):

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It’s that time of year again…

 

Resolutions. Renewed Focus. Dreamcasting. Goal Setting.

No matter what you are committing yourself to this year, anyone serious about accomplishing set goals will have to embrace the prioritization of thoughts and habits in order to see their desires come to life. Here are some day-to-day tips that might help you actualize your professional goals in 2016 (in no particular order):

 

  • Write your goals down on paper and revisit them often with further thoughts, questions, and actionable next steps. If possible, place this paper somewhere visible (e.g., desk, office wall, etc.).
  • Tell a mentor or trusted colleague about what you hope to accomplish this year and ask them to check in with you each month or quarter to track progress.
  • Create attainable milestones and schedule them out on your calendar and share it with someone you trust as an overall plan.
  • Resist the urge to be sidetracked by too many goals. Try to prioritize and accomplish one to two goals at a time. Which goals matter most to you? Work on those first. Think priority over ease.
  • Minimize the noise of social media and other unnecessary distractions. Focus on the task at hand. Enter a season where your goal becomes priority without your need to share it with others or be “in the know”. Put down your phone. It’s going to be okay.
  • Learn something new about what you’re hoping to accomplish (e.g., read a book on the topic, attend a seminar or workshop, interview others who do it well, etc.).
  • Do something small each day. Your accomplishment will be the collective result of many small action steps that may appear insignificant at the time. Keep moving forward and never underestimate the life-shaping power of a small act.

 

If you feel that this all sounds like common sense, it is. It’s just uncommon practice in a busy world that loves the thought of executing ideas but rarely gets to them. Keep pressing on. Your goals are too important not to pursue.

Think Big. Start Small. Keep Moving.

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Charles Lee <![CDATA[3 Things to Ask Before 2016]]> http://charlestlee.com/?p=10709 2016-05-02T16:57:27Z 2015-12-31T16:29:18Z It’s that time of year… …to reflect on our past year, refocus our priorities, and renew our commitments. I really love the natural space the end of the year creates for

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It’s that time of year…

…to reflect on our past year, refocus our priorities, and renew our commitments.

I really love the natural space the end of the year creates for us to think ahead in life. I hope you’ll take some time to take a quick step back in order to move forward with focus in 2016. Here are 3 simple questions that I ask myself at the end of each year that I hope you find helpful in prepping for next year:

    1. What is the one thing I learned in 2015 that has helped me grow as a person that I must keep integrating into my life? (Write this down on paper and keep it somewhere visible that you can see daily.)
    2. Who are the people that invested in my life in 2015 that I have yet to thank? (Take a few minutes today to write to these folks and acknowledge their influence in your life.)
    3. What are my personal and professional priorities in 2016 that I must be mindful of in 2016? (These aren’t necessarily “goals” or “resolutions”. It’s really about writing down what matters most to you and then recommitting daily practice that moves you closer to living out what you say are priorities.)

What are some things you do to reflect, refocus, and renew this time of year?

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Charles Lee <![CDATA[5 Tips for Kick Starting the Day]]> http://charlestlee.com/?p=10323 2016-05-02T16:57:54Z 2015-10-16T16:46:14Z It’s Still Dark Out Kicking off a day early with energy and focus doesn’t just happen for most people. A quick survey of influencers and leaders who have a reputation of

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It’s Still Dark Out

Kicking off a day early with energy and focus doesn’t just happen for most people. A quick survey of influencers and leaders who have a reputation of being innovative idea-makers will show you that most, if not all of them, take intentional steps to discipline their morning lives to ensure they start the day positioned for success.

I was never a “morning person” growing up. It has taken years of working at disciplining my life towards the value of an early start. As responsibilities have increased in my life, I came to realize that there weren’t enough undistracted hours in the day with team responsibilities to do everything I needed to do. I suppose rearranging my morning became a necessity. Nevertheless, it wasn’t easy to reframe life this way.

Here are 5 helpful tips I’ve picked up over the years that have helped me start early and with energy and focus:

#1 – Start the Night Before

The battle for the morning starts the night before. Resist the urge to “decompress” by watching TV, surfing the web, or catching up on emails late into the night. These types of cognitive stimulation increases brain activity that causes neurons to race. The “glow” alone from devices that go through our eyes delay the release of melatonin that helps induce sleep. In other words, there’s nothing super helpful that comes from these types of late night activities. Give yourself 90 minutes to a couple of hours before bed time to relax and slow down your mind in preparation for the next day. I promise you’ll be better off for it. You can always catch up later or on the weekends when it comes to entertainment.

#2 – Kickstart the Senses & Embrace the Cold Shower

Many people recommend that we kickstart our senses in the morning to help get our brains and bodies going. Since most of us can’t afford to build a freeze chamber used in cryotherapy, something as simple as a cold shower can be helpful. I know what you’re thinking…NO WAY!!! Yes way. Cold showers actually improves blood circulation, immune strength, metabolic rate, and even mood (once you’re done that is). For those of you who are fortunate enough to have access to a swimming pool, go ahead and dive in!

#3 – Move Your Body

We all know exercise is good to regularly engage. If you don’t have time to exercise in the morning, consider getting to work 10 minutes earlier to go for a brisk walk around your building. This will help kickstart some blood circulation and get you refocused on the day ahead. I often get to the office early, drop off my stuff, and then go for a quick 10 minute walk before sitting down. It’s amazing what 10 minutes can do to help reframe your mind and body.

#4 – Recenter Your Thoughts

Most leaders that I’ve spoken to make time each morning (minimally 5-10 minutes) to refocus and prioritize their day. It’s not so much about meditation or emptying of the mind. It’s actually the opposite. This is a time to refocus the mind and center one’s life to things that truly matter for the day. I usually ask myself two core questions each day: (1) At the end of the day, what will matter most? and (2) What is enough? – These two questions allow me to focus in on things that truly matter and guide me in better framing how much is enough for this upcoming day.

#5 – Eat Well

I used to just skip the morning meal cause I never felt I had enough time. This was a big mistake. Meals fuel our bodies and help us become more productive. Of course, eating anything is rarely a good thing. I try to get some protein and fruits in and try to stay away from carbs (when possible…I LOVE carbs!). Also, I don’t try to eat large amounts of food at one sitting (unless it’s the weekend!). I hate the feeling of being full sitting at the desk so I try remind myself of that disgust while eating the meal. Yes, a mind trick there.

Stay Practical & Listen to Your Body

Look, no one’s perfect. I’m definitely not. Nevertheless, this can’t be an excuse we use not to take better care of ourselves. Let’s continue to do what we can to start our days well.

Disclaimer: If you are a parent of young children, these tips may not directly apply to you. You have a lot to handle in the morning. Nevertheless, do what you can with the time you have. Little spurts of self-filling activities will do wonders for your parenting and relationships.

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Charles Lee <![CDATA[Mediocrity is Selfish]]> http://charlestlee.com/?p=10302 2016-05-02T16:58:21Z 2015-09-05T16:15:57Z Mediocrity will eventually kill our creative souls. Settling for “good enough” is the lie that takes away our ability to be fully alive. No one starts life with a mission to

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Mediocrity will eventually kill our creative souls.

Settling for “good enough” is the lie that takes away our ability to be fully alive. No one starts life with a mission to be mediocre. Strive for greatness.

Greatness does not require perfection nor money nor fame. It’s not about how many people like you, recognize you or reference you. Greatness could care less about who gets the credit. Ironically, greatness is not about us.

Greatness is found in the integrity that can only come from a life that lives out his/her intended design for the benefit of others. Yes, others.

Contrarily, mediocrity is actually a self-consumed, self-preserving behavior that diminishes the true value of personhood and suffocates the purposes originally designed within us to benefit others. In other words, mediocrity is one of the greatest expressions of selfishness.

Strive for greatness and experience the joy of benefiting others and the deep fulfillment of living out our designed purpose.

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